Archive for the 'patristic' Category

When you give a feast . . .

808fe-25ce25a425ce259f25ce25a525ce25a425ce25a525ce25a625ce259b25ce259f25ce25a5Then He also said to him who invited Him, “When you give a dinner or a supper, do not ask your friends, your brothers, your relatives, nor rich neighbors, lest they also invite you back, and you be repaid. But when you give a feast, invite the poor, the maimed, the lame, the blind. And you will be blessed, because they cannot repay you; for you shall be repaid at the resurrection of the just.” . . . .
“A certain man gave a great supper and invited many, and sent his servant at supper time to say to those who were invited, ‘Come, for all things are now ready.’ But they all with one accord began to make excuses. . . . the master of the house, being angry, said to his servant, ‘Go out quickly into the streets and lanes of the city, and bring in here the poor and the maimed and the lame and the blind.’” St. Luke 14: 12-14, 16b-18a, 21b
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St. Paul

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Theotokos foundation
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For as the body is one and has many members, but all the members of that one body, being many, are one body, so also is Christ. . . .  the eye cannot say to the hand, “I have no need of you”; nor again the head to the feet, “I have no need of you.” No, much rather, those members of the body which seem to be weaker are necessary. And those members of the body which we think to be less honorable, on these we bestow greater honor; and our unpresentable parts have greater modesty, but our presentable parts have no need. But God composed the body, having given greater honor to that part which lacks it, that there should be no schism in the body, but that the members should have the same care for one another. And if one member suffers, all the members suffer with it; or if one member is honored, all the members rejoice with it. St. Paul’s letter to the Corinthians 12: 12, 21-26
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Scripture quotations from biblegateway.com 
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Al-Kafaàt (Abilities)        The Sheltering Tree        Challenge Liturgy         Estia         Icons for the Blind         Monastery of St. Martyr Grand Princess Elizabeth         St. John the Campassionate Mission         Panfilovo          In Case of Fire, Use Stairs         Deaf Orthodox Christians         Koinonia for Exceptional Orthodox Families         The Body of Christ: A Place of Welcome for People with Disabilities         Getting My First Hug         Church & the Child with Invisible Disabilities         Disability & Communion         Who is My neighbor?         Depression: Can It Be An Opportunity?         Prof. Dmitry Avdeev, M.D., Ph.D.         Blessed Matrona of Moscow          Helping Martin Succeed         A Letter to the Church         St. Mark the Deaf         Fr. George Florovsky & the Wild Child         Special Needs in Sunday School 1   2         St. John Chrysostom, Almsgiving, & Persons with Disability         Inclusion Awareness Workbook         Does the Orthodox Church adequately support their members with disabilities?         Special needs children in the Church         Mental health & relationship to God         Hopegivers         Personhood, Human Brokenness & the Therapeutic Calling of the Eastern Orthodox Church         Embracing All God’s Children: Orthodox Theology Concerning Disability & Its Implications for Ministry with Special Needs Youth in the Orthodox Church
God chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise, God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong, God chose what is low and despised in the world, even things that are not, to bring to nothing things that are, so that no human being might boast in the presence of God.” (1 Corinthians 1:27-29)

johnlahutskyOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA4ffaukraine_01_jpg_jpg45c5f-downiheartzion485511_658089894203358_2139785322_nbe80f-lilliana-1st-bdayElizabeth's 2011Jean-Vanier-3Songs of Experience (Mairs)Blessed_Matronan53927283354_6440orphans in the meadowe93da-6a00d83451580669e2010535fb037d970c-320wiOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAlana's personal reflection on Church services and her special needs family30-15b15dWolf Wolfensberger † Feb. 27, 2011Incense is therapeutic, except . . .paisios7clip_image002a-cross14921avdeev-photo

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St. John Chrysostom †407

St. John Chrysostom

“If you ever wish to associate with someone, make sure that you do not give your attention to those who enjoy health and wealth and fame as the world sees it, but take care of those in affliction, . . . in critical circumstances, . . . who are utterly deserted and enjoy no consolation. Put a high value on associating with these, for from them you shall receive much profit, . . . and you will do all to the glory of God. God Himself has said, ‘I am the Father of orphans and the protector of widows. (Psalms 67:6)’”

 

 

 

Disability Resources: Ministries

The ministries that have been found (surely there are many more) are listed on two pages, international and U.S. (my location).  The ministries in traditional Orthodox Christian countries are considerably more developed, and these ministries serve as a goal for the developing Orthodox Church in the U.S. to aim for.

Ministries (International) 

This list contains Orthodox Christian ministries which serve and enable persons with disabilities in Russia, Lebanon, Belarus, Macedonia, Egypt, Palestine, the Ukraine, Australia, Georgia, India, Canada, Moldova, Ethiopia, Romania, Sierra Leone, Papua New Guinea, Kenya, Albania, Armenia, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Finland, Hungary, Serbia-Montenegro, Syria, Poland, the United Kingdom, and Greece. Quite a few are associated with monasteries. Here are seven outstanding efforts:

Al-Kafaàt (Abilities) (Lebanon); Monastery of St. Martyr Grand Princess Elizabeth (Belarus); The Village of Panfilovo (Russia); The Four Homes of Mercy (Palestine); Tikhvin Icon of Our Lady Temple, (Moscow, Russia); Saint Paraskeva Orthodox Charity (Romania):  Theotokos Foundation, (Greece).

Ministries (U.S.) 

As the Orthodox Church is spread out across the U.S., most of the ministries listed are individual Parish ministries, and one Parish Church can do just so much; most of the ministries are once a month or once a year one day or weekend events which are held once a month or once a year.  The Special Olympics Multi-Sport Training Camp at Antiochian Village, Ligonier, Pennsylvania   sponsored by the Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese of North America, is an annual (once a year) week-long event.

But there are some ministries that operate on a continual basis; The Hellenos House (see also Christopher), on Long Island, New York, which is affiliated with The Challenge Liturgy Ministry (see also Ministry Profile), providing a permanent home for seven persons with developmental disabilities.

There is also the Sheltering Tree in Omaha, Nebraska, which also provides housing, day programs, and frequent, periodic activities, both at their Activity Center and out in the community. Their motto is “Serving and empowering people with developmental disabilities.”

 

 

Disability Resources: Articles and Books

There are lots of articles but not so many books. Many of the books listed address people with disabilities as a side topic, and I’ve included some non-Orthodox Christian books that contain Orthodox Christian elements. But the ones that spring from family johnlahutskyrelationships and friendships are inspiring and instructive.

In To Read – Books: 

The Boy from Baby House 10 & Catherine’s Pascha In God’s Hands: A mother’s journey through her infant’s critical illness & Getting My First Hug

The articles are on two different pages, one for individual articles and the other for webpages that contain numerous articles concerning persons with disability:

To read (online articles) & To read (online article collections)

From the article collections, I would recommend beginning with The Orthodox Church of America’s Parish Ministry Resources, especially Parish Development

The individual online articles cover a wide variety of situations and perspectives in regard to disability and the Orthodox Church, as well as the situations and issues Orthodox Christians with disabilities face in this world: their opportunities, dilemmas, and struggles. Look over the list and read a couple of articles which catch your eye. And then feel free to read some more!

 

Disability Resource Pages: An Episcopal Statement & a Booklet: Concise Summaries of the Orthodox Christian Understanding of Life Shared with People with Disabilities

 

SCOBA: Disability and Communion

from The Standing Conference of Orthodox Bishops in America on Disability and Communion, June 25, 2009: Embracing People with Disabilities within the Church

Welcoming People with Disabilities

The Body of Christ: A Place of Welcome for People with Disabilities

15 pp. By Fr. John Chryssavgis; from Light and Life Publishing

 

Depression and Orthodox Christian Psychotherapy: A doctoral dissertation

Author: Archimandrite Andrew (Vujisić) of Tralles

This is probably the most in-depth Orthodox Christian writing contained in this resource weblog on the traditional Orthodox Christian Way in regard to the healing of  the mind, heart, and body of those with the disabilities of depression and anxiety – which includes just about all of us at one time or another, though for some these maladies are chronic, entailing a continual struggle.

Dig in!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

To access: 

THE IMPACT OF ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN NEPTIC-PSYCHOTHERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS ON SELF-REPORTED DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMATOLOGY AND COMORBID ANXIETY

“the Mighty One entered, and put on insecurity”

Syriac Nativity Icon

An excerpt from St. Ephrem the Syrian’s Nativity Hymn 11, translated by Sebastian Brock, the distinguished Oxford Syriac scholar (The Harp of the Spirit, Fellowship of St Alban and St Sergius, 1983).

(icon from Iconography of the western Syriac Churches)

Your mother is a cause of wonder:
the Lord entered into her
and became a servant; he who is the Word entered–
and became silent within her;
Thunder entered her and made no sounds;
there entered The Shepherd of all,
and in her He became the Lamb, bleating as He comes forth.
Praise to You to whom all things are easy, for You are almighty.

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Your mother’s womb has reversed the roles:
the Establisher of all entered into His richness,
but came forth poor; the Exalted one entered her,
but came forth meek; the Splendrous one entered her,
but came forth having put on a lowly hue.
Praise to You to whom all things are easy, for You are almighty.

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The Mighty one entered, and put on insecurity
from her womb; the Provisioner of all entered–
and experienced hunger; He who gives drink to all entered–
and experienced thirst; naked and stripped
there came forth from her He who clothes all!
Praise to You to whom all things are easy, for You are almighty.

Saint Ephrem the Syrian

icon from The Feast of Mor Ephrem

Saint Naum the Miracle-worker of Ohrid †910

St. Naum

St. Naum is called upon to intercede with the Lord for people with mental disorders.

St. Naum of Ohrid (or Preslav) followed in the footsteps of St. Cyril and Methodius, missionaries to the Slavic lands, who translated liturgical texts from Greek into the language of the people, Slavonic. As they lived before the schism with Rome, St. Naum accompanied St. Cyril and Methodius to Rome, where God worked many miracles through them, so that the Pope came to see their translation work as a work of God. On their way back to their mission field, the Slavic lands, they traveled through Germany, where they opposed a number of heresies, and were tortured and imprisoned. Freed through an earthquake from God, they proceeded to Bulgaria, where St. Naum traveled about with fellow disciple St. Clement distributing the Bulgarian translation of the Holy Scriptures and preaching the Way of Christ. His feastday is December 23.

Sources: OCA.org: St Nahum of Ochrid, the Disciple of Sts Cyril and Methodius, Equal of the Apostles & A List of Saints Called upon for … Mental Disorders

There is a Monastery on the shore of Lake Ohrid named after him: St. Naum Monastery on Ohrid Lake, Macedonia


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