Archive for the 'international' Category

The Message Given to the Parents of Alfie Evans & Charlie Gard, and to all British Citizens (and perhaps, in Time, to us as well) : The GOVERNMENT DECIDES When to Pull the Plug and to Stop the Food and Water, NOT YOU (And don’t even think about pursuing alternate treatments).

April 23, 2018 – Respirator Removed, Nutrition Withheld. Pope Francis’ offers an alternative in line with Catholic values; English courts reject and prohibit this option; Alfie holds on . . . The Daily Caller: Alfie Evans Is Breathing On His Own But Government Officials Are Starving Him To Death. WHY?  

April 28, 2018 – LifeNews: Alfie Evans has died.

November 1, 2012, 6 years earlier, the Guardian reports that 85% of England’s National Health Service Trusts have adopted the Liverpool care pathway (LCP) – The Guardian: NHS trusts adopt end-of-life regime which can involve withholding food

1986: Paul Brophy, disabled by a brain injury,  dies eight days after the Massachusetts Supreme Court authorizes hospital personnel to halt his G-Tube Feedings – Catholic Culture: When Food and Water are Withheld . . . 

Alfie Evans and his parents are not the first such victims of Britain’s National Health Service; in 2017 it was Charlie Gard: Alliance for Freedom: Charlie Gard and the Death of Dignity See Also – The Witherspoon Institute: Parental and Governmental Authority in Medical Decisions: The Tragic Case of Charlie Gard

From the Bloomberg Review, April 26, 2018:

It really is this simple. The British state has decided that it is the baby’s best interest to die, and it is trying to ensure that he dies expeditiously. It is overriding parental rights in the process.

A Call for legal reform The Spectator: The agony of Alfie Evans’ parents was made worse by bad law

The law never envisaged the situations we are now seeing, where the NHS wishes to terminate care and the law is used to stop the parents from seeking other solutions – usually from overseas.

An indictment, with scholarly analysis: Church Life Journal: Aiming at the Death of Disabled Children

Another case, Ashya King. His parents took him from England to Europe (Prague) for treatment. The parents spent three days in jail for this. But the proton-beam treatment was successful; Ashya is cured! Though England’s National Health Service refuses to treat Ashya King’s cancer, he is cured when his parents have him treated in another country

The British National Health Service responds by refusing therapy anywhere in the country to Ashya; the parents have to take him to Spain for that. The NHS Retaliates by refusing Ashya King Therapy

Meanwhile, in the State Capital of New York: LifeNews: Proposed New York State Bill Allows Starving Patients to Death Without their Consent But thanks be to God, https://rocklandrtl.org/2015/05/06/great-news-from-albany-denial-of-treatment-bills-withdrawn/  There are people in power that will continue to push for this!

In Texas, a Hospital Ethics Panel – Not the Patient or Family – Decides Whether to End Care

Advertisements

From the Transfiguration Brotherhood: Church Life for People with Limited Capacities

There is a movement within the Russian Orthodox Church, the Transfiguration Brotherhood, initiated by Father Georgy  Kochetkov, who is

 The Transfiguration, from      Wikimedia Commons

also the Rector of St. Philaret’s Christian Orthodox Institute. The Brotherhood has members in Russia and also in other countries as well, both men and women. Local brotherhood communities are formed for, in their words, 

. . . . Bible studies and prayer meetings held at home, where they may also discuss pressing church and personal matters. Members of the Brotherhood share Eucharistic worship and agape meals (prayerful meals of love and thanksgiving). Members of the Brotherhood are involved in the life of many parishes and seek to build relationships with Christians in other cities and countries.

Their webpage-  The Transfiguration Brotherhood  (see their About Us page). and their Facebook page

This Brotherhood has also given consideration to persons with disabilities. See the post below for details; it is very good, and not long at all:

Gathered Together for One and the Same Purpose: It is important for members of the church community to regard those with limited capabilities as brothers, sisters and friends, rather than as ‘objects in need of assistance

John Swinton: Taking Seriously the Body of Jesus

Disability theology: Taking Seriously the Body of Jesus 

by John Swinton (a professor of Divinity and Religious Studies at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland

I find two main themes in this article by Dr. Swinton to be very pertinent, very central to our life together with people who have disabilities:

  1. A reminder that knowledge pertains to the body, and not only to the mind.
  2. The harmonious working together of the Body of Christ- all members, including those with disabilities- is “the heart of the Gospel.” 

Books by John Swinton, the majority of which relate to persons with disabilities: Goodreads: John Swinton’s Books

Here’s one of them: Goodreads: Resurrecting the Person: Friendship and the Care of People with Mental Health Problems, by John Swinton

From the Ministry of St. Elizabeth Convent in Belarus

To access website:

Ministry of St.Elisabeth Convent: Children with special needs make icons of St. John of Shanghai and San Francisco

Children from the boarding school for children with special needs and the convent’s studio “Anyolak” prepared an exhibition of drawings “A gift to St. John” devoted to the feast day of St. John of Shanghai San Francisco.  

From The Catalog of Good Deeds posted by Nun Elena (Strashinova) July, 2017 St. Elisabeth Convent

 

 

 

When you give a feast . . .

808fe-25ce25a425ce259f25ce25a525ce25a425ce25a525ce25a625ce259b25ce259f25ce25a5Then He also said to him who invited Him, “When you give a dinner or a supper, do not ask your friends, your brothers, your relatives, nor rich neighbors, lest they also invite you back, and you be repaid. But when you give a feast, invite the poor, the maimed, the lame, the blind. And you will be blessed, because they cannot repay you; for you shall be repaid at the resurrection of the just.” . . . .
“A certain man gave a great supper and invited many, and sent his servant at supper time to say to those who were invited, ‘Come, for all things are now ready.’ But they all with one accord began to make excuses. . . . the master of the house, being angry, said to his servant, ‘Go out quickly into the streets and lanes of the city, and bring in here the poor and the maimed and the lame and the blind.’” St. Luke 14: 12-14, 16b-18a, 21b
icon-of-st-paul

St. Paul

theotokos_detail_sm
Theotokos foundation
d
For as the body is one and has many members, but all the members of that one body, being many, are one body, so also is Christ. . . .  the eye cannot say to the hand, “I have no need of you”; nor again the head to the feet, “I have no need of you.” No, much rather, those members of the body which seem to be weaker are necessary. And those members of the body which we think to be less honorable, on these we bestow greater honor; and our unpresentable parts have greater modesty, but our presentable parts have no need. But God composed the body, having given greater honor to that part which lacks it, that there should be no schism in the body, but that the members should have the same care for one another. And if one member suffers, all the members suffer with it; or if one member is honored, all the members rejoice with it. St. Paul’s letter to the Corinthians 12: 12, 21-26
a              
Scripture quotations from biblegateway.com 
 a
Al-Kafaàt (Abilities)        The Sheltering Tree        Challenge Liturgy         Estia         Icons for the Blind         Monastery of St. Martyr Grand Princess Elizabeth         St. John the Campassionate Mission         Panfilovo          In Case of Fire, Use Stairs         Deaf Orthodox Christians         Koinonia for Exceptional Orthodox Families         The Body of Christ: A Place of Welcome for People with Disabilities         Getting My First Hug         Church & the Child with Invisible Disabilities         Disability & Communion         Who is My neighbor?         Depression: Can It Be An Opportunity?         Prof. Dmitry Avdeev, M.D., Ph.D.         Blessed Matrona of Moscow          Helping Martin Succeed         A Letter to the Church         St. Mark the Deaf         Fr. George Florovsky & the Wild Child         Special Needs in Sunday School 1   2         St. John Chrysostom, Almsgiving, & Persons with Disability         Inclusion Awareness Workbook         Does the Orthodox Church adequately support their members with disabilities?         Special needs children in the Church         Mental health & relationship to God         Hopegivers         Personhood, Human Brokenness & the Therapeutic Calling of the Eastern Orthodox Church         Embracing All God’s Children: Orthodox Theology Concerning Disability & Its Implications for Ministry with Special Needs Youth in the Orthodox Church
God chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise, God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong, God chose what is low and despised in the world, even things that are not, to bring to nothing things that are, so that no human being might boast in the presence of God.” (1 Corinthians 1:27-29)

johnlahutskyOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA4ffaukraine_01_jpg_jpg45c5f-downiheartzion485511_658089894203358_2139785322_nbe80f-lilliana-1st-bdayElizabeth's 2011Jean-Vanier-3Songs of Experience (Mairs)Blessed_Matronan53927283354_6440orphans in the meadowe93da-6a00d83451580669e2010535fb037d970c-320wiOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAlana's personal reflection on Church services and her special needs family30-15b15dWolf Wolfensberger † Feb. 27, 2011Incense is therapeutic, except . . .paisios7clip_image002a-cross14921avdeev-photo

 a

St. John Chrysostom †407

St. John Chrysostom

“If you ever wish to associate with someone, make sure that you do not give your attention to those who enjoy health and wealth and fame as the world sees it, but take care of those in affliction, . . . in critical circumstances, . . . who are utterly deserted and enjoy no consolation. Put a high value on associating with these, for from them you shall receive much profit, . . . and you will do all to the glory of God. God Himself has said, ‘I am the Father of orphans and the protector of widows. (Psalms 67:6)’”

 

 

 

Disability Resources: The personal blogs and offerings of Orthodox Christians with disabilities

(Also included: The online offerings of family members)

The author of this blog is a group home advisor who lives and works with adults with developmental disabilities. (Me – W.G.) I’ve done this for 26 years. It has had its many moments of frustration. And it has had its wonderful moments as well. I thank God for this opportunity, this life, these relationships.

But the truth is that I have been paid for my service as an advisor. And the organization with which I am employed gives me time off. And in a number of years, not so far away, I will retire from this role.

This is not the case with the people with disabilities themselves, and their family members. These relationships- mother, father grandmother, son, daughter – are lifelong;  for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week one lives with a disability with no time off, unless, of course, there is healing or successful medical intervention.

The webpages below are those of such people- Orthodox Christian persons with disability and their family members. For ten years I have compiled these resources and commented on them. But the insights shared on the websites below come from a place deeper within those that share them than my thoughts on the subject. I invite you to learn from them.

Online Orthodox Christian persons with disabilities & their family members


Orthodoxadultautists: A blog by an orthodox autist, for orthodox autists   by Monica. See especially A letter to the Church

Stephen Yates and son Axel: Yates and Son

Morning Coffee by Alana; see especially Sitting on the Front Pew 

Beth Hopkin’s In Case of Fire, Use Stairs

Bethany Sheldahl’s weblogNot of this World

 Catherine’s Pascha: Wheelchairs and Sidewalks by Charlotte Riggle (See also Home Page & Trailer for the book “Catherine’s Pascha” )

The Oprisko familyThe Least of These: Raising autism in the church, with dignity

Pasha, Russian orphan, has been adopted by David and Dawn Heatwole, members of Saint Catherine Mission, Hagerstown, MD

What Do You Do DEAR? Telling the honest truth about our beautiful new normal by Mary Evelyn

And Baby Makes 12 A conversation between Khorea Frederica Mathewes-Green and Mary Klopcic; from Ancient Faith Radio also Mair’s Momilies see especially How do you do it?

Girada Marius’ “I want to fight! I write using the nose, but I write … “

Loving a Child with Autism by Khorea Frederica Mathewes-Green; from Frederica.com

The Story: Steve and Tony Sakak  + (Website Homepage)

The Tcaci family Mental Health Advocates in Moldova Use Film to Tell Stories of Children with Disabilities

Facebook: Deaf Orthodox Christians

Facebook: Kathyrn Kessler, an Orthodox Christian with Crohn’s Disease: Fighting the Good Fight With Faith And Love 

Facebook: Koinonia for Exceptional Orthodox Families 

The Turner Family, Randolph, New Jersey 

Greek American Girl 

Living with the Woof (a service dog)

Disability Resources: Ministries

The ministries that have been found (surely there are many more) are listed on two pages, international and U.S. (my location).  The ministries in traditional Orthodox Christian countries are considerably more developed, and these ministries serve as a goal for the developing Orthodox Church in the U.S. to aim for.

Ministries (International) 

This list contains Orthodox Christian ministries which serve and enable persons with disabilities in Russia, Lebanon, Belarus, Macedonia, Egypt, Palestine, the Ukraine, Australia, Georgia, India, Canada, Moldova, Ethiopia, Romania, Sierra Leone, Papua New Guinea, Kenya, Albania, Armenia, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Finland, Hungary, Serbia-Montenegro, Syria, Poland, the United Kingdom, and Greece. Quite a few are associated with monasteries. Here are seven outstanding efforts:

Al-Kafaàt (Abilities) (Lebanon); Monastery of St. Martyr Grand Princess Elizabeth (Belarus); The Village of Panfilovo (Russia); The Four Homes of Mercy (Palestine); Tikhvin Icon of Our Lady Temple, (Moscow, Russia); Saint Paraskeva Orthodox Charity (Romania):  Theotokos Foundation, (Greece).

Ministries (U.S.) 

As the Orthodox Church is spread out across the U.S., most of the ministries listed are individual Parish ministries, and one Parish Church can do just so much; most of the ministries are once a month or once a year one day or weekend events which are held once a month or once a year.  The Special Olympics Multi-Sport Training Camp at Antiochian Village, Ligonier, Pennsylvania   sponsored by the Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese of North America, is an annual (once a year) week-long event.

But there are some ministries that operate on a continual basis; The Hellenos House (see also Christopher), on Long Island, New York, which is affiliated with The Challenge Liturgy Ministry (see also Ministry Profile), providing a permanent home for seven persons with developmental disabilities.

There is also the Sheltering Tree in Omaha, Nebraska, which also provides housing, day programs, and frequent, periodic activities, both at their Activity Center and out in the community. Their motto is “Serving and empowering people with developmental disabilities.”

 

 


Archives

Blog Stats

  • 115,702 hits
June 2018
S M T W T F S
« May    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
Advertisements

%d bloggers like this: