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Aphasia

Many people probably have Aphasia and don’t even know it!

What is Aphasia?

Aphasia is a language disorder that happens when you have brain damage. Aphasia may make it hard for you to understand, speak, read, or write. It does not make you less smart or cause problems with the way you think.

Signs of Aphasia

Aphasia can lead to a number of different problems. You may have trouble talking, understanding, reading, and writing.

Talking
You may find that you:

Can’t think of the words you want to say.
Say the wrong word. Sometimes, you may say something related, like “fish” instead of “chicken.” Or you might say a word that does not make much sense, like “radio” for “ball.”
Switch sounds in words. For example, you might say “wish dasher” for “dishwasher.”
Use made-up words.
Have a hard time saying sentences. Single words may be easier.
Put made-up words and real words together into sentences that do not make sense.
Understanding
You may:

Not understand what others say. This may happen more when they speak fast, such as on the news. You might have more trouble with longer sentences, too.
Find it hard to understand what others say when it is noisy or you are in a group.
Have trouble understanding jokes.
Reading and Writing
You may have trouble with the following things:

Reading forms, books, and computer screens.
Spelling and putting words together to write sentences.
Using numbers or doing math. For example, it may be hard to tell time, count money, or add and subtract.

Causes of Aphasia

Aphasia is most often caused by stroke. However, any type of brain damage can cause aphasia. This includes brain tumors, traumatic brain injury, and brain disorders that get worse over time.

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On Charlotte Riggle’s Blog: The Logos for My Nonverbal Son, by Summer Kinard

An Orthodox Christian Mom explains the success of an assisted language learning system (PODD) through her own experience with her non verbal son.The mom, whose name is Summer Kinard, also discusses a fuller meaning of the Greek word “Logos” in terms of her son’s developing relationship with her and her husband:

Logos has grown up in a Church filled with words and people and holy images. It cannot be separated from the holy Church or the witness of the icons to the Incarnation. We were never able to know the Logos until He became flesh and dwelt among us.

That’s where I see the Logos growing in my boy. The Logos of God is relationship, not vocabulary. In stilted, simple language, we are limping toward meaning, all the while becoming more and more like God.

And this applies to all who are pressing forward to know the Lord.

The Post: The Logos for My Nonverbal Son

The System: PODD: Pragmatic Organisation Dynamic Display

On You Tube: We Speak PODD

 

John Swinton: Who is the Stranger? A Practical Theology of Hospitality and Friendship

 

John Swinton is a theology professor at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. To learn more:

Wikipedia: John Swinton

From Summer Kinard: Writing, Autism, & Theology as a Mother of Joy

Summer Kinard is a Greek Orthodox Christian mother who home-schools five children, four of whom are autistic; she is highly qualified to do this, as she has earned two Master’s degrees. Her advise in regard to being supportive of persons on the autism spectrum has real depth:

7 Ways to Act on Your Autism Awareness in Church

What stands out on the following page is the practicality of her advice. She gets down to the nitty gritty:

Special Needs Resources

Also, A Video from Summer Kinard’s You Tube Page. Subscribe to Access all of them: Summer Kinard: Awetism

“Everything Tells Us about God:” An Autism-Accessible Book

Everything Tells Us About God is an illustrated children’s picture book by Katherine Bolger Hyde. The illustrations are by Livia Coloji.  Also: (Livia’s Facebook page)

The following blog post is a conversation about the book  between Charlotte Riggle and Summer Kinard, A brief summary description would not do the book justice, and these ladies provide a substantial commentary on Everything Tells Us About God:

Everything Tells Us about God: An Autism-Accessible Book

The Publisher’s Page: Ancient Faith: Everything Tells Us About God

A 12 Minute Audio Interview: Ancient Faith: An Interview with Katherine Bolger Hyde

Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese of North America: Gleanings From a Book: Everything Tells Us About God by Katherine Bolger Hyde

The following one minute You Tube clip concerning another of Kathryn Bolger Hyde’s books, Lucia, Saint of Light, is read by Chrissi Hart:

 

 

 

Dr. Eric Carter: Creating a sense of belonging for Children and Adults with Disabilities

NOTE: Dr. Eric Carter is not affiliated with LDS or Brigham Young University; he first studied at Wheaton College and now is a Professor in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. He has concentrated his efforts toward the inclusion of people with disability in Churches, and while not an Orthodox Christian, has a lot of good insights that could be put into practice in Orthodox Christian Parishes. The following resource is fairly short and simple, summarizing the major themes he has found to be most helpful:

Ten simple ways to create a sense of belonging for children and adults with disabilities

 


Also, one of the many of Dr. Carter’s Presentations on You Tube. This one of the shorter ones:




_______________

Here are some other resources he has placed online which go into the details of these themes:

Putting faith and job seekers with disabilities to work

(Gal 5:6: For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision nor uncircumcision avails anything, but faith working through love.)

One of Dr. Eric Carter’s Books:

Including People with Disabilities in Faith Communities: A Guide for Service Providers, Families, and Congregations

Bio: Dr. Eric Carter Also: His Faith Ability Page

Supporting The Expression of Spirituality For Persons with Intellectual Disabilities:

http://faithanddisability.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/RESEARCH-REPORT-.pdf

From the Transfiguration Brotherhood: Church Life for People with Limited Capacities

There is a movement within the Russian Orthodox Church, the Transfiguration Brotherhood, initiated by Father Georgy  Kochetkov, who is

 The Transfiguration, from      Wikimedia Commons

also the Rector of St. Philaret’s Christian Orthodox Institute. The Brotherhood has members in Russia and also in other countries as well, both men and women. Local brotherhood communities are formed for, in their words, 

. . . . Bible studies and prayer meetings held at home, where they may also discuss pressing church and personal matters. Members of the Brotherhood share Eucharistic worship and agape meals (prayerful meals of love and thanksgiving). Members of the Brotherhood are involved in the life of many parishes and seek to build relationships with Christians in other cities and countries.

Their webpage-  The Transfiguration Brotherhood  (see their About Us page). and their Facebook page

This Brotherhood has also given consideration to persons with disabilities. See the post below for details; it is very good, and not long at all:

Gathered Together for One and the Same Purpose: It is important for members of the church community to regard those with limited capabilities as brothers, sisters and friends, rather than as ‘objects in need of assistance


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