Archive for the 'prayer' Category

Other great Orthodox Christian blogs that address disability issues

I’ve been surveying Orthodox Christian disability resources for 10 years, and now I will be taking a break.   Many others, mostly mothers, have taken up blogging, sharing their experiences and discoveries. As I have worked in a group home for many years, this is personal for me as well, but not in the same way as a mother of a child with disabilities. Mothers are mothers 24 hours a day, for their entire lives. There is great depth to what they write, not necessarily in terms of new information,  but the kind of depth which comes from the heart, which is the important kind of depth. This is true, of course, of the blog and websites written by persons with disabilities themselves.

You will find much, ongoing information, personal and otherwise, on the blogs listed on the webpage below. Give them a look:

Online Orthodox Christian persons with disabilites & their family members

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disability Resources: The personal blogs and offerings of Orthodox Christians with disabilities

(Also included: The online offerings of family members)

The author of this blog is a group home advisor who lives and works with adults with developmental disabilities. (Me – W.G.) I’ve done this for 26 years. It has had its many moments of frustration. And it has had its wonderful moments as well. I thank God for this opportunity, this life, these relationships.

But the truth is that I have been paid for my service as an advisor. And the organization with which I am employed gives me time off. And in a number of years, not so far away, I will retire from this role.

This is not the case with the people with disabilities themselves, and their family members. These relationships- mother, father grandmother, son, daughter – are lifelong;  for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week one lives with a disability with no time off, unless, of course, there is healing or successful medical intervention.

The webpages below are those of such people- Orthodox Christian persons with disability and their family members. For ten years I have compiled these resources and commented on them. But the insights shared on the websites below come from a place deeper within those that share them than my thoughts on the subject. I invite you to learn from them.

Online Orthodox Christian persons with disabilities & their family members


Orthodoxadultautists: A blog by an orthodox autist, for orthodox autists   by Monica. See especially A letter to the Church

Stephen Yates and son Axel: Yates and Son

Morning Coffee by Alana; see especially Sitting on the Front Pew 

Beth Hopkin’s In Case of Fire, Use Stairs

Bethany Sheldahl’s weblogNot of this World

 Catherine’s Pascha: Wheelchairs and Sidewalks by Charlotte Riggle (See also Home Page & Trailer for the book “Catherine’s Pascha” )

The Oprisko familyThe Least of These: Raising autism in the church, with dignity

Pasha, Russian orphan, has been adopted by David and Dawn Heatwole, members of Saint Catherine Mission, Hagerstown, MD

What Do You Do DEAR? Telling the honest truth about our beautiful new normal by Mary Evelyn

And Baby Makes 12 A conversation between Khorea Frederica Mathewes-Green and Mary Klopcic; from Ancient Faith Radio also Mair’s Momilies see especially How do you do it?

Girada Marius’ “I want to fight! I write using the nose, but I write … “

Loving a Child with Autism by Khorea Frederica Mathewes-Green; from Frederica.com

The Story: Steve and Tony Sakak  + (Website Homepage)

The Tcaci family Mental Health Advocates in Moldova Use Film to Tell Stories of Children with Disabilities

Facebook: Deaf Orthodox Christians

Facebook: Kathyrn Kessler, an Orthodox Christian with Crohn’s Disease: Fighting the Good Fight With Faith And Love 

Facebook: Koinonia for Exceptional Orthodox Families 

The Turner Family, Randolph, New Jersey 

Greek American Girl 

Living with the Woof (a service dog)

Disability Resource Pages: An Episcopal Statement & a Booklet: Concise Summaries of the Orthodox Christian Understanding of Life Shared with People with Disabilities

 

SCOBA: Disability and Communion

from The Standing Conference of Orthodox Bishops in America on Disability and Communion, June 25, 2009: Embracing People with Disabilities within the Church

Welcoming People with Disabilities

The Body of Christ: A Place of Welcome for People with Disabilities

15 pp. By Fr. John Chryssavgis; from Light and Life Publishing

 

Depression and Orthodox Christian Psychotherapy: A doctoral dissertation

Author: Archimandrite Andrew (Vujisić) of Tralles

This is probably the most in-depth Orthodox Christian writing contained in this resource weblog on the traditional Orthodox Christian Way in regard to the healing of  the mind, heart, and body of those with the disabilities of depression and anxiety – which includes just about all of us at one time or another, though for some these maladies are chronic, entailing a continual struggle.

Dig in!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

To access: 

THE IMPACT OF ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN NEPTIC-PSYCHOTHERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS ON SELF-REPORTED DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMATOLOGY AND COMORBID ANXIETY

“the Mighty One entered, and put on insecurity”

Syriac Nativity Icon

An excerpt from St. Ephrem the Syrian’s Nativity Hymn 11, translated by Sebastian Brock, the distinguished Oxford Syriac scholar (The Harp of the Spirit, Fellowship of St Alban and St Sergius, 1983).

(icon from Iconography of the western Syriac Churches)

Your mother is a cause of wonder:
the Lord entered into her
and became a servant; he who is the Word entered–
and became silent within her;
Thunder entered her and made no sounds;
there entered The Shepherd of all,
and in her He became the Lamb, bleating as He comes forth.
Praise to You to whom all things are easy, for You are almighty.

+

Your mother’s womb has reversed the roles:
the Establisher of all entered into His richness,
but came forth poor; the Exalted one entered her,
but came forth meek; the Splendrous one entered her,
but came forth having put on a lowly hue.
Praise to You to whom all things are easy, for You are almighty.

+

The Mighty one entered, and put on insecurity
from her womb; the Provisioner of all entered–
and experienced hunger; He who gives drink to all entered–
and experienced thirst; naked and stripped
there came forth from her He who clothes all!
Praise to You to whom all things are easy, for You are almighty.

Saint Ephrem the Syrian

icon from The Feast of Mor Ephrem

A Sensory Garden

Winter does not look like the perfect season for starting a new garden. However . . .  

Alyona Ovlashevich, who works in The Boarding Home for Children with Special Needs while studying towards a degree in landscape design, came up with the idea of a sensory garden on the territory of the home.  . . .

‘There is a vacant plot of land on the territory of the boarding home. It caught my attention some time ago,” Alyona says. “We are going to improve it and transform it into a sensory garden next spring. I am certain that it will bring a lot of positive feelings and new discoveries to our children!’ . . . 

Nature plays an important role in the children’s upbringing and education. . . . The children will be able to look at the beautiful plants, smell their scents, touch the plants and even taste some of them.  . . .

Read the entire story of this Sensory Garden, which was written by Tatiana Shimko:

A Garden for Children with Special Needs  

from the Website Catalogue of St Elisabeth Convent 

(your purchases will help support the Convent, which is devoted to continual prayer and works of mercy)

 

Invisible Chronic Illness: Some Personal Reflections

Alana is an Orthodox Christian wife, mother, thinker, etc.  from the state of Kentucky, USA; her website is entitled Morning Coffee 

In How my Illness Affects my life in Church,  Alana writes of how she misses out on a lot of Parish Life because of her fibromyalgia (compounded by a current bout with mononucleosis) – such as the Parish social events where she would have opportunities to really get to know fellow parishioners. Alana speaks of how she loves singing in the choir, which is not possible for her now. In fact she misses a lot of services, and the ones she does make present continual challenges. These difficulties cause her to struggle, outwardly and inwardly. At the end of this post, she presents a wish list for parishes to consider in regards to parishioners with disabilities. http://morningcoffee.blogspot.com/2011/09/i-found-out-just-now-that-someone-out.html 

In 30 Things, Alana lists thirty truths about her life, a few of which are simple facts, but mostly are  personal details about her life with fibromyalgia/ Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Mononucleosis and Hypoglycemia.  http://morningcoffee.blogspot.com/2011/09/in-honor-of-national-chronic-invisible.html 

In Homeschooling with Chronic Illness, Alana writes briefly in regard to her adventure of homeschooling her children as she contends with these disabilities. http://morningcoffee.blogspot.com/2011/09/homeschooling-with-chronic-illness.html

Explore Alana’s website; it is thoughtful, honest, and insightful. 

d
picture from r2a2r2j258.wordpress.com 

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