Archive for the 'stories' Category

Saints for Students with Learning Difficulties

Saints for Students with Learning Difficulties 

by Agatha Rodi

from the webpage of  Charlotte Riggle

 

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Ms. Rodi is a teacher in Greece who feels blessed to be teaching children with disabilities who have been mainstreamed into her classrooms. She speaks of prayers which enable both teacher and student, and of Saints who she finds especially helpful as she works with students with dyslexia, autism, issues with working memory, short-term memory, stuttering, and ADHD,

St. John of Kronstadt from Wikimedia Commons

She lists four Saints to whom she prays, and how certain of these Saints helped a student of hers with learning difficulties. And she writes of these things in an inspirational way:
Be inspired and don’t hesitate to teach students with special talents. They will surprise you along the course of time, and you will feel how much they changed you as a human being. The impact is huge.  . . . .          d Prayer is the key!  . . . .   s Faith is the magic word to make the impossible, possible!

Brain Injury Rehabilitation

(With a focus on Prism Adaption Treatment) a video will appear in a moment . . .

See also From Wikipedia – Prism Adaption

Summer Kinard: Patron Saints of Autism

An Article from Summer Kinard’s website “writing, autism, & theology as a mother of joy:”

The Patron Saints of Autism

Access the Article by Clicking on the Title below):

Patron Saints of Autism

Wikimedia: the Most Holy Theotokos

Wikimedia: St. Antony

Wikimedia: St. John Maximovich

Wikimedia: St. Bartholomew

Wikimedia: St. Panteleimon

Wikimedia: St. Anastasia

Aphasia

Many people probably have Aphasia and don’t even know it!

What is Aphasia?

Aphasia is a language disorder that happens when you have brain damage. Aphasia may make it hard for you to understand, speak, read, or write. It does not make you less smart or cause problems with the way you think.

Signs of Aphasia

Aphasia can lead to a number of different problems. You may have trouble talking, understanding, reading, and writing.

Talking
You may find that you:

Can’t think of the words you want to say.
Say the wrong word. Sometimes, you may say something related, like “fish” instead of “chicken.” Or you might say a word that does not make much sense, like “radio” for “ball.”
Switch sounds in words. For example, you might say “wish dasher” for “dishwasher.”
Use made-up words.
Have a hard time saying sentences. Single words may be easier.
Put made-up words and real words together into sentences that do not make sense.
Understanding
You may:

Not understand what others say. This may happen more when they speak fast, such as on the news. You might have more trouble with longer sentences, too.
Find it hard to understand what others say when it is noisy or you are in a group.
Have trouble understanding jokes.
Reading and Writing
You may have trouble with the following things:

Reading forms, books, and computer screens.
Spelling and putting words together to write sentences.
Using numbers or doing math. For example, it may be hard to tell time, count money, or add and subtract.

Causes of Aphasia

Aphasia is most often caused by stroke. However, any type of brain damage can cause aphasia. This includes brain tumors, traumatic brain injury, and brain disorders that get worse over time.

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On Charlotte Riggle’s Blog: The Logos for My Nonverbal Son, by Summer Kinard

An Orthodox Christian Mom explains the success of an assisted language learning system (PODD) through her own experience with her non verbal son.The mom, whose name is Summer Kinard, also discusses a fuller meaning of the Greek word “Logos” in terms of her son’s developing relationship with her and her husband:

Logos has grown up in a Church filled with words and people and holy images. It cannot be separated from the holy Church or the witness of the icons to the Incarnation. We were never able to know the Logos until He became flesh and dwelt among us.

That’s where I see the Logos growing in my boy. The Logos of God is relationship, not vocabulary. In stilted, simple language, we are limping toward meaning, all the while becoming more and more like God.

And this applies to all who are pressing forward to know the Lord.

The Post: The Logos for My Nonverbal Son

The System: PODD: Pragmatic Organisation Dynamic Display

On You Tube: We Speak PODD

 

John Swinton: Who is the Stranger? A Practical Theology of Hospitality and Friendship

 

John Swinton is a theology professor at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. To learn more:

Wikipedia: John Swinton

Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness and Support

On Facebook there is a page for those who have had brain injuries to share their stories and information, most of which relate to healing:

Wikipedia: Concussion Anatomy

Facebook Group: Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness and Support

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See below for larger picture & words

A few of the websites shared on this Facebook Page: 

Surviving Traumatic Brain Injury 

(Donna O’Donnell Figurski) Many personal stories, a list of resources, a book with the story of a caregiver (Donna) and more 

No Memory of the Day that Changed My Life

 (Michelle Munt) Her story, blog posts, chat groups, and more

The Hope After a Brain Injury Network

“Our Mission  is to Advocate, Educate, and Serve all Affected by Brain Injury” A Magazine, a Blog, Resources, and more

 

 


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