No hope for Jacob Barnett? Rather, a brilliant young physicist!

(Thanks to his mother, Christine Barnett)

 

Jacob

@

A short article from The Mother List with a 22 minute video:

 This Mother Tore Off Labels And Nurtured Her Son’s Hidden Genius

Christine Barnett’s book: Goodreads:

The Spark: A Mother’s Story of Nurturing Genius

See also Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics Welcomes Exceptional Young Talent & Jacob’s Place

Picture from The Proactionary Transhumanist 

Also from The Proactive Transhumanist

During a TedXTeen 2012 event, Jacob had given an inspirational speech, arguing in favor for everyone to abandon the archaic ideal to learn as much as possible and to instead replace it with thinking. In doing so, he “theorizes” . . .  that you’ll begin opening yourself to a vast array of possibilities and creativity. The video is provided below:

“… But God composed the body, having given greater honor to that part which lacks it …”

A Scripture, a question, a story …

1 Corinthians 12:20-26

Teddy Kremer

But now indeed there are many members, yet one body.  And the eye cannot say to the hand, “I have no need of you”; nor again the head to the feet, “I have no need of you.”  No, much rather, those members of the body which seem to be weaker are necessary. And those members of the body which we think to be less honorable, on these we bestow greater honor; and our unpresentable parts have greater modesty, but our presentable parts have no need. But God composed the body, having given greater honor to that part which lacks it, that there should be no schism in the body, but that the members should have the same care for one another. And if one member suffers, all the members suffer with it; or if one member is honored, all the members rejoice with it.

Question: Hi. I am a teacher at a school for students with Special Needs. Within this school we have students with Down’s Syndrome. In your opinion, why did God create such a disability and how and in what state do such people with this disability achieve ‘everlasting life’? I find this a stumbling block in my spiritual path. Regards, Steve.

Answer: Steve, this is certainly a deep and serious question, of the sort that eventually led me to the Orthodox Church. I would like to share a story from an Orthodox list:

The Story: Where is God’s Perfection

 

Melissa Riggio: “I Have Down Syndrome: Know Me Before You Judge Me”

 

Melissa Riggio- Photograph by Annie Griffiths Belt

This is a page-long National Geographic article in which Melissa shares her dreams and also her life with the genetic condition Down Syndrome.

To access:

I Have Down Syndrome–Know Me Before You Judge Me

Here’s a poem by Melissa:

Love is a potion

Love is everything

Love is all around

Love is not hopeless

Love is a passion

Love will not stop

Love is an ocean

 

Here’s her weblog, on which we are given the very sad news that Melissa has died.

To access: Melissa Ann Riggio: 1988-2008

Allow her words, from the article and from the poems, to inspire you. Here’s another of her poems:

The Ring

I’m in the Ring outside
I’m following my belief
I’m looking at the sky
I saw God following my heart
I’m an ordinary woman

The Ring is falling down my way
The wind is blowing me away
The Ring is falling down,
Down my way
The wind is blowing me away

And so I came back to
The center of the Ring
Am I just a broken angel?
God has sent me here to heal
To be an ordinary woman.

 

FREDERICA.COM: Loving a Child with Autism

armsopenwide:

From Beliefnet via FREDERICA.COMLoving a Child with Autism

The Holy Cross

(For those readers who aren’t Orthodox Christians, a Khorea is a priest’s wife and and also his co-laborer in the local parish; in this case Holy Cross Antiochian Orthodox Church in Lithincum, Maryland. Her husband is Father Gregory Matthewes-Green. )

Khorea Frederica Matthewes-Green, an Orthodox Christian author, has published online a concise story of the first five years her family’s life with her grandson Adam, who has been diagnosed with autism. It is a reprint from Beliefnet, April 13, 2007, in their Christian Life, Family and Marriage section. Here it is (again):

FREDERICA.COM, April 12, 2007: Loving a child with autism

Image from iconreader.wordpress.com. 2012/03/17

Originally posted on Arms Open Wide:

Loving a Child with Autism   

(For those readers who aren’t Orthodox Christians, a Khorea is a priest’s wife and and also his co-laborer in the local parish)

Khorea Frederica Matthewes-Green, an Orthodox Christian author, has published online a concise story of at least the beginning of  her and her family’s life with her grandson Adam, who has been diagnosed with autism. It is reprinted from Beliefnet, April 13, 2007, in their Christian Life, Family and Marriage section. Here it is (again):

 Loving a Child with Autism: http://www.frederica.com/writings/loving-a-child-with-autism.html

View original

“Feeling Safe to Explore Something New,” by Anna Rose

This is a post from a blog entitled Rose with Thorns: Hope of Recovery for All

St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church

It is written by a young lady named Anna Rose who is a student at Oxford University in England. She confesses in her About section that she has some disabilities. She also states the purpose of her blog:

. . . to help support and give hope to all of those struggling with any mental illness, learning disability, and hardship.

She does speak of her baptism, but she is not an Orthodox Christian; rather, she is a Catholic. However, she speaks in positive terms of a visit to an Orthodox Church in the blog post in question, which can be accessed here:

Feeling Safe to Explore Something New

She speaks of her own struggles in entering a new and strange place and how confident it made her feel to be able to do so. She also had this to say about the Church, in regard to those fears: “The whole church was so majestic and awe-inspiring. Soon my wonder conquered my fear.”

 

 

“Children with Special Needs and the Orthodox Christian Family,” by Fr. Stephen Tsichlis

Fr. Stephen explores “the waves and billows,” the struggles, inner and outer, that an Orthodox family with a disabled member can face. He concludes with a story of an encounter with a person with disabilities who has received acceptance in her own Orthodox parish.

It can be read in its entirety by clicking on the following web address:

Orthodox Church in America, Resource Handbook / Parish Development / Volume III – 2010: Children with Special Needs and the Orthodox Christian Family, by Father Steven P. Tsichlis 

A online community for the mutual support for Orthodox Families with exceptional family members

733779_278401358958954_148307697_nThe Webpage: Facebook: Koinonia for Exceptional Orthodox Families community

Of course one has to have a Facebook Page to be a part of this community. One also had to join. But one will find a wonderful mix of resources and stories on the site. 

Here’s two stories that have been shared this summer:

Dominic Gondreau’s Special Vocation: To Show People How To Love

Taking Away My Daughter’s Smile


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